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March 13, 2021

What classifies as a historical source?

What classifies as a historical source?

Historical sources include documents, artifacts, archaeological sites, features. oral transmissions, stone inscriptions, paintings, recorded sounds, images (photographs, motion pictures), and oral history. Even ancient relics and ruins, broadly speaking, are historical sources.

What are two main sources of history?

History: Primary & Secondary SourcesPrimary sources include documents or artifacts created by a witness to or participant in an event. Primary sources may include diaries, letters, interviews, oral histories, photographs, newspaper articles, government documents, poems, novels, plays, and music.

How do you find a good primary source?

6 Free Online Resources for Primary Source DocumentsNational Archives. The National Archives is a fantastic resource. DocsTeach. Also run by the National Archives, DocsTeach is full of activities for educators. Spartacus Educational. Fordham University. The Avalon Project. Life Magazine Photo Archive. Easy iPad Access.

What are the 2 types of sources?

Primary & Secondary Sources Secondary sources interpret or analyze a primary source. A secondary source provides commentary and discussion of a primary source.

What type of source is a picture?

What are primary sources? Primary sources are materials from the time of the person or event being researched. Letters, diaries, artifacts, photographs, and other types of first-hand accounts and records are all primary sources.

What is a popular source?

Popular sources — intended for a general audience of readers, they are written typically to entertain, inform, or persuade. Popular sources help you answer who, what, when, and where questions and are essential for finding information about current events or issues.

What is a popular source example?

Examples include general news, business and entertainment publications such as Time Magazine, Business Weekly, Vanity Fair. Note, special interest publications which are not specifically written for an academic audience are also considered “popular” i.e., National Geographic, Scientific American, Psychology Today.